Tag Archive: Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix



That’s cheating, I know…but I couldn’t choose between them. It’s not meant as a diss to Imelda Staunton’s Umbridge or the written portrayal of Barty Crouch Jr. They’re both wonderfully despicable.

Look at that. David Tennant’s face could become a meme right there. He was amazing in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire. That’s a really important book in the series and the Prisoner of Azkaban movie kind of disappointed me, so when I went to watch the movie I was nervous about how well the story would be represented on screen. This was the period when directors were being switched around and things looked as unsteady as possible for a film series that has never changed the three main actors, but David Tennant did not disappoint. His whole story is morbidly fascinating, made only more so by his being one of the Death Eaters who tortured Neville’s parents into madness, and he conveys the qualities of his character perfectly on screen. It’s a fairly difficult task given how many little details from the book were left out.


On to Umbridge…to be frank, I think she was way scarier in the books than in the movies for some reason. She didn’t end up looking as unpleasant as I was hoping (although the abundance of pink did help her get there) and I was particularly upset that the teacher inspections and fights with McGonagall were either cut out or nowhere near as intense as I expected. From my perspective, those were a key part of her character because that’s how her evil was articulated in Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix. Imelda Staunton didn’t really take risks with the character like David Tennant did (quick tidbit: the tongue thing was actually an improvisation on his part and not in the script…genius). I don’t mean to compare them as actors rather than characters, but when you’re talking about a beloved book that became an equally beloved movie, it’s hard not to. In the books, she gets under everyone’s skin and makes students and teachers alike hate her so much that she kind of becomes a unifying force among those who might not otherwise even speak to each other. The obvious example is the formation of Dumbledore’s Army, which teaches Harry such an important lesson (that he doesn’t have to do everything alone, even if he is the Chosen One) and is so incredibly important to his ultimate triumph. Not gonna lie, though, I kinda wish we’d gotten to see the bitch dying at the end of Deathly Hallows 2.

So, do you agree? Disagree? Have a different villain in mind entirely?

A/N: Yes, I am aware that September aka Harry Potter Month has ended. However, I did such a pathetic job of it that I feel like it’s physically impossible for me to call it quits yet. I have some awesome posts lined up for the grand finale, and I’m gonna get them out of my drafts queue. So I’ll extend HP Month to the end of October, but that’s it. I’ll probably still do some HP posts after that, but it’ll be back to business as usual for the most part.


A lot of people I know say this one might be their least favorite book because of how angsty and moody Harry is (and also because of who dies at the end). It’s true, his character really does get darker in this book and we discover some of his imperfections. It’s hard to relate to for younger kids, but for me, it came out at the perfect time. I’m one of the lucky ones who was the same age as Harry when all the later books were released, and 15 was not a good time for me. It was kinda nice thinking about his troubles for a bit.

I also love the glimpses of the previous generation we get in this book…not to mention Dumbledore’s Army. Bad. Ass. To top it off, Order of the Phoenix contains my favorite Potter villain. I enjoy loathing Dolores Umbridge almost more than Lord Voldemort because as the series goes on, she becomes proof that bureaucracy, when corrupt, can be its own class of evil. She institutionalizes everything that Harry fights against, and he still finds a way to get around it. The way J.K. Rowling writes about abandonment and anxiety just makes his courage that much more admirable.

Plus, this is the book where Fred and George Weasley make their grand exit from Hogwarts, which is without a doubt one of my favorite scenes in the entire series. I can’t even count how many times I dreamed about sticking it to the teachers/admin and walking out of school when I was 15. To see it done so creatively and described in such vivid detail always makes me smile. That scene translated beautifully onto the silver screen, too. I went to the midnight premiere when the movie came out and the entire theater was cheering!

I like seeing Harry’s darker side in this book…it prevents his character from falling into the stereotype of the perfect hero who everyone loves. I can’t think of many other novels in which the writer makes the negative perception of the protagonist this believable. I’ll admit, there were some points at which I didn’t really like Harry myself, but I think it’s needed in order to stop him from ending the series looking like a saint.

For me, this book is the one that has the perfect blend of humor, dark themes, and run-of-the-mill teenage worries. The later ones start to reflect deeper political and social issues more, which I love, but can’t always connect with the same way.